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You Could Always Adopt. . .

Adopted 3 boys out of foster care, then got pregnant for my beautiful daughter, now currently pregnant again with twins.

Wednesday, June 18, 2008

Hateful

I got a call from my new principal. Apparantly, my former principal talked to him and said some bad things about me. I'm sure he's not the only one she's bad-mouthed me about. She said I had discipline problems and that everyday it was something I couldn't handle! I had to explain that I was dealing with children who had extreme behavior problems over and over and nothing was allowed to be done besides detention. I explained about my hands being tied. I also informed him that my only evaluation I had from her was good. I was never written up!

I just can't understand why this bitch is being so vicious. Why is she working so hard to keep me from getting a job?

I am well aware that it is illegal to sad bad things about a former employee and am consulting a lawyer. The problem is her family is rich, powerful and well-respected.

There goes my reputation down the drain! Thank goodness this principal didn't hold it against me, but it explains why I didn't get calls back from principals who'd seemed desperate to hire at the interviews.

9 Comments:

  • At 2:41 PM, Blogger Diane said…

    I just found your site and am enjoying reading your posts. I will be checking back as often as I have time.
    Diane
    www.fosterfamilytalk.com

     
  • At 5:21 PM, Blogger GirlSpeaks said…

    It is legal, though not always advisable, to include negative details of a former employee's work history in the course of a reference check. However, this is going to vary from state to state, so it's best to check your states laws for exact answers.

    I know that as a former office manager, if someone called and asked me direct questions, we were allowed to answer them honestly. I never lied about someone, but I was also deadly honest... Especially when I had written documentation to back them up (and it didn't always have to be a write-up with their signature).

    Case in point, I fired a young man for doing drugs on the job. He was a driver for our company. I got a call about two months later asking me if I would hire him back again. I responded with a no. I was then asked if I minded explaining the reason behind my decision to let him go. I explained that our company has a ZERO tolerance policy when it came to drugs, but aside from that, he wasn't that bad of a worker.

    It's sad that some past employers can't let certain issues go, and it's even sadder when gov't jobs (such as schools) are working against teachers to make things harder on them when the public needs more.

    My advice to you would be to research your state laws VERY carefully, and if it is found to be illegal in yoru state- Then send a kind, but firm notarized letter (keep a copy and get delivery confirmation and signature receipt)to your previous employer along with a copy of the laws informing her that any future negative actions will result in you contacting the proper officials.

    Remember, there is ALWAYS someone above someone unless they own the company/organization lock, stock, and barrel!

     
  • At 5:27 PM, Blogger GirlSpeaks said…

    PS: I found this for you- http://www.privacyrights.org/fs/fs16-bck.htm

    What can my former employer say about me?

    Often a potential employer will contact an applicant's past employers. A former boss can say anything [truthful] about your performance. However, most employers have a policy to only confirm dates of employment, final salary, and other limited information. California law prohibits employers from intentionally interfering with former employees' attempts to find jobs by giving out false or misleading references. (California Labor Code §1050)

    Under California law and the laws of many other states, employees have a right to review their own personnel files and make copies of documents they have signed. If you are a state or federal employee, your personnel file is protected under the California Information Practices Act or the federal Privacy Act of 1974 and can only be disclosed under limited circumstances. (California Civil Code §56.20; California Labor Code §§432, 1198.5; 5 USC §552a)

     
  • At 9:44 PM, Blogger JUST A MOM said…

    GIVE THEM TIME TO SEE JUST HOW GREAT YOU ARE.... sorry for caps lock,, YOU show them what y ou are made of and do not let some craby you know spoil your joy! Hey I told ya I would go kick her ass for ya,,,, any time. I know you don't read at my place but I am lovign my new job but I am loosing my guy he has not died just moving out of state so I will have to learn that part of my job... I am so sorry you are having a hard time this week... must be in the air my good friend is having a hard time too.... It has been 8 years for her ((HUGS))

    oh yeah I so hope K is doing better with you and know that it is NOT YOU ,,, he does not trust,,, hang in there.

     
  • At 9:22 AM, Blogger Kristen said…

    That's awful!!! I don't know what to say, just that I'm sorry she is being so hateful. I do believe Karma will get her someday for it though if it makes you feel any better. ;-)

     
  • At 12:41 PM, Blogger Runergirl said…

    Girlspeaks, it is only legal if it is true, otherwise it is called slander.

    DM, there is only documentation of your one evalution and it was good, so she should keep her mouth shut unless she wants a law suit.

    You need to contact her boss and explain what she is doing and also request your file.

     
  • At 10:25 AM, Blogger Heather said…

    Wow! I don't understand why anyone would act this way. I hope what comes around goes around.

     
  • At 2:57 PM, Blogger Happy Mama to Three said…

    You know, this may actually be a blessing in disguise right now. Your new principal will be looking for the things that were said she will be seeing how very good you are at your job and how committed you are. If you disprove one thing someone has said, you cast doubt on everything they have said.

    If this hasn't effected the new job, I might be inclined to let it ride. The new principal didn't let it change her decision. Unfortunately the education field is often such a closely knit family that taking the high road and ignoring her will show your maturity and her spitefulness. Of course if it continues a letter would not be inappropriate and would express the facts slinging mud.

    I so hope that the new job is much better than your last. It already sound like you will have a better principal.

    Hoping for the best!!!

    Cindi

     
  • At 12:49 PM, Blogger bloggingmomto2 said…

    When do you start your new job?
    How is everything going with your boys?

     

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